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The Three Brothers

I love this story as it exemplifies how we should view traditional Chinese medicine and the part it plays in the healthcare of oriental peoples for over 4,000 years.

There was a famous Chinese doctor, who lived some 4,000 years ago. He was celebrated for his skills and knowledge of medicine and his ability to heal even the most fatal disease. He cured the emperor’s son who was believed dead, in a miraculous exhibition of his skills. The emperor asked why he was so much better than is two brothers, who were also doctors.

He replied, my first brother heals sickness before it even develops, so his methods and skills appear unseen and he is known only within our village. His practice involves giving advice on food, exercise and lifestyle to keep his patients well. My second brother deals with illnesses while they are chronic or minor, preventing sickness from getting worse and returning the body to health. He cares for his patients through acupuncture and herbs to rebalance them back to good health when they become ill. I treat diseases when they threaten to destroy the person. This requires several medicines, skill and knowledge in their use. For this reason my name has become famous throughout the kingdom, yet I am simply a surgeon who is called upon when all else fails. My first brother has the knowledge to deal with illness before they arise and my second brother is able to treat them at an early stage and prevent them getting worse. Though my fame has spread throughout the land, their knowledge is greater.

The first two brothers is how traditional Chinese medicine works with preventative dietary and lifestyle advice, acupuncture and herbs. The third brother who was the surgeon is how modern western medicine works. Today we need to have all disciplines available to holistically treat the various health disharmonies in people’s lives. Keeping healthy is surely one of the most important elements of a happy life. Before a person becomes ill, we need to treat with appropriate diet, exercise and lifestyle. When a person becomes ill, we need to treat with acupuncture and herbs first and only when these methods are not enough, we should use western medicine which includes surgery and powerful drugs with their equally powerful and harmful side effects.



James O’Sullivan from Galway is a credible and engaging speaker, a people friendly practitioner and lecturer of Integrated Medicine, serving his patients, his students and the public with the positive benefits of both Conventional Western Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine. He is a respected author and has appeared on many public media. #jamushur


Disclaimer

This article is not intended to diagnose or assess. The information provided is not to be considered a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care practitioner.


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Sun Si Miao – famous physician


Chinese Medicine is a deep and intricate art that has been practiced for thousands of years. Throughout its history, there have been many famous physicians who have advanced and grown its capacity to help people. We are indebted to the man famous practitioners and teachers who devoted their lives to contribute to its long history. Without these contributions, we would never have the knowledge and skills, techniques and literature to practice and further develop this medicine today.

Sun Si-Miao, a Chinese Medicine physician, during the Tang dynasty (618-907 AD) wrote the following beautiful advice and it serves to emphasize the art, science, and honesty aspects of the medicine we practice here. It is a useful code for practitioners of any form of medicine…


A Guide to Medical Workers: “The Golden Principle”

When people come to you with a serious disease and ask for help, you cannot concern yourself with whether they are esteemed or dishonorable, wealthy or poor, elderly or young, beautiful or ugly. Your care must be safe, and not swayed by whether they are your dearest family member or your adversary, your good friend or a stranger, American or foreigner, foolish or wise. In your mind’s eye each patient is on the same level, degree and class, and is treated as close as family. Your care must never by self-serving or motivated by what brings good for bad fortune, or by that which is pleasing or upsetting. Your protection and care should be precisely what is necessary: no more, no less, without deference to your own safety and life. Know, in your heart, that your good deeds are sincere and not a game. Show courage but caution. Actively explore and broaden your knowledge but stand firmly on the principles of which you are certain.

Chinese Medicine is not a “cure-all”, but it is an effective, adaptable medicine that when used properly can treat any number of conditions. There is a responsibility on the practitioner’s part to listen closely to the patient and use all their skills to devise appropriate treatments.

There is also a responsibility on the patient’s part to involve themselves in their own health and wellbeing. By making dietary, lifestyle, and mental changes, patients can greatly improve their health and live a more full and vibrant life.


In the Smiling Body clinic, we hope all our patients that you will not just be free from illness, but that you will learn to lead vibrant lives that enable you to grow stronger mentally and physically throughout your years.
I have also included with this article some famous sayings by Sun Si-Miao. Like all famous sayings that survive time and scrutinization and critique over history, I would advise to read with an open mind and accepting heart.

Sun Si Miao Quotes:

Medicine is intention. Those who are proficient at using intention are good doctors.” ~ Sun Si Miao

First, modify the patient’s diet and lifestyle and only then, if these do not effect a cure, treat with medicinal herbs and acupuncture.” ~ Sun Si Miao

Whenever a great physician treats disease, he has to be mentally calm and his nature firm. He should not give way to wishes and desires but must develop first a marked attitude of compassion.He should commit himself firmly to the willingness to take the effort to save every living creature.” ~ Sun Si Miao

Doctors should first understand the cause of disease, then treat it with diet. Medicine should only be used if diet fails.” ~ Sun Si Miao

Above all, I will keep an open heart. As I move on the right path I will receive great happiness as a reward without asking for anything in return.” ~ Sun Si Miao

Food is Medicine too!



James O’Sullivan from Galway is a credible and engaging speaker, a people friendly practitioner and lecturer of Integrated Medicine, serving his patients, his students and the public with the positive benefits of both Conventional Western Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine. He is a respected author and has appeared on many public media. #jamushur


Disclaimer

This article is not intended to diagnose or assess. The information provided is not to be considered a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care practitioner.


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Practical Chinese Medicine


This book is an introduction to Traditional Chinese Medicine from the perspective of Tuina Chinese Medical Acupressure. It guides the student through the theories and cultural philosophies of this exceptional medical discipline. It is an excellent first year student textbook that is written in the same down to earth, easy to understand sentences that the ancient Chinese practitioners used to teach their students. It covers everything in the necessary foundation to begin your lifelong study of this outstanding medical discipline.

Buy this Book here.


James O’Sullivan from Galway is a credible and engaging speaker, a people friendly practitioner and lecturer of Integrated Medicine, serving his patients, his students and the public with the positive benefits of both Conventional Western Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine. He is a respected author and has appeared on many public media.


Disclaimer

This article is not intended to diagnose or assess. The information provided is not to be considered a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care practitioner.


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Traditional Chinese Medical Posters


These beautifully illustrated posters contain all the acupoints you need in order to complete your training in acupuncture, Tuina or Shiatsu. It is also an excellent focus point for your clinic to show your clients and patients the acupoints used in treatment.

Convenient and stylish 12″ x 18″ or 30cm x 45cm size poster can be purchased with link on each image.







The twelve Heavenly Star qi-points of Ma Dan Yang, who was a famous Daoist practitioner of traditional Chinese medicine, around 1140 A.D. These are his famous chosen Qi-points as recorded in his ode to 11 miraculous acupuncture points, which was published in the Jade Dragon Manual in 1329. the twelfth Qi-point LR-03 was added by Xu Feng who introduced the Eight Extraordinary Vessels.

These excellent, important and powerful points should always be considered when diagnosing and choosing your point prescription.



The Eight Extraordinary Vessels are considered to be more ancient than the conventional meridian system and yet so simple and powerful when energised, stimulated or balanced for their related conditions. A must for every practitioner of traditional Chinese medicine.

Convenient and stylish 12″ x 18″ size poster can be purchased by clicking the image below.



The Five Elements/Phases, translated from Wu Xing, is an exceptional ancient form of traditional medicine. This poster stays true to the original texts of the Wu Xing masters who used this method to treat a wide variety of conditions. It contains the Wu Xing acupoints of the 12 Zang Fu Organs and the Mother and Child acupoints (Tonification and Sedation points). Also included is the Horary Clock which is used to diagnose and treat the Patterns of Disharmony.

Convenient and stylish 12″ x 18″ or 30cm x 45cm size poster can be purchased, by clicking on the images below




The Horary point is the local acupoint to a particular meridian (i.e. wood point on a wood pathway). This local meridian acupoint becomes a horary point during the two-hour period of maximum energy for that particular meridian. Outside of that time slot, it returns to a normal acupoint. The horary acupoint become a very powerful point for body/mind/ spirit during the horary time slot. Activating the horary acupoint, we can reach the official and boost and revitalize the Qi of that element. It works similar to when a poker is used to stoke the ashes of a fire, and allow the fire to blaze.

This class of acupoint plays a major role in some techniques involving the Stems, where some points are considered closed or open depending on specific time, month or year.

Convenient and stylish 12″ x 18″ size poster can be purchased with link below.


 


The Five Elements or Phases of Chinese Medicine have brought a rich understanding of health and especially so with Chinese Nutritional Healing. This poster helps with identifying the foods associated with each Element. It makes an ideal study aid or educational poster for the clinic reception.


Hope you like these posters and they are very helpful in your training into the most gratifying career there can be, that is helping others with Traditional Chinese Medicine.

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Qi Deficiency


Qi – The Vitality of Life

Chinese philosophers and thinkers of all times, have engaged with the concept of Qi, right from the beginning of Chinese civilisation up to our modern times. It is the vital energy that circulates throughout the universe. It fills the air we breathe, it’s the constituent parts and nutrients contained in the food we eat. It is the life that starts the heart beating and our first breath after leaving our mother’s womb.

It is excellently described in the Chinese symbol for Qi (vapour, steam, & rice), illustrating that Qi can be as rarefied and immaterial as vapour, and as dense and material as rice. It also signifies that Qi is a subtle substance (vapour, steam) deriving from a coarse material (rice) just as steam is produced by cooking rice.

The translation into any other language from Chinese proves a difficult task and many different translations have been proposed, none of which gives even an approximation of the essence of Qi exactly.  It has been translated as “energy”, “vitality”, “ether”, “matter-energy”, “vital force”, “life force”, “vital power” among more.  The reason it is so difficult to translate the word “Qi” correctly, lies  in the particular fluid nature whereby Qi can manifest differently and be different things in different situations.

Disharmony

In traditional Chinese medicine when Qi is out of balance, the clinical manifestations of its four basic disharmonies are many. It is important to note that the clinical manifestations mentioned here are a complete picture of most of the manifestations recorded and that in real life someone may experience only some or more of these manifestation. This short article could never convey a complete description of Qi in medical terms.

The clinical manifestations of a Qi Deficiency may include all or some of the following:

Fatigue, Tiredness, exhaustion, muscle weakness, general weakness, lack of energy, apathy, poor concentration, lack of appetite, profuse perspiration, spontaneous sweating or sweating on light exercise like just walking a short distance, loose stools, lethargy, disillusionment, dislike to speak, and all these manifestations may be made worse on exertion or with exercise. It is not necessary for someone to experience all these manifestations. When diagnosing according to Traditional Chinese Medical theory, it cannot be over emphasised the importance of a holistic clinical picture, which includes all symptoms and signs of disharmony.

Causes of Qi deficiency

This syndrome often results from excess mental work, often in highly organised people.

overwork, excessive exercise, lack of good nutrition usually due to lack of optimum nutritional knowledge. A sedentary lifestyle can also contribute to a Qi deficiency.

Treatment of Qi Disharmony

Treating any Qi disharmony requires a complete history taking with analysis to diagnose which disharmony the person is suffering from. If you experience any of the above symptoms over a long period of time, I would recommend seeking out a competent practitioner or you may consult myself online by completing my extensive 350 question consultation form. When a diagnosis is achieved, the next step is to formulate a treatment protocol which usually involves some acupuncture points that can be stimulated by acupressure with herbal and dietary advice.

Foods to Nourish Qi

Where possible, try to eat lightly cooked, fresh, local, seasonal produce. The emphasis is on complex carbohydrates in vegetables and unrefined grains and eating small frequent meals.

The following foods are considered excellent foods to strengthen Qi.

Beans/grains/pulses Chickpeas, lentils, wheat bran, millet, quinoa, rice,
Vegetables Asparagus, Carrot, button mushroom, cabbage, eggplant, peas, potato, pumpkin, shiitake mushroom, squash, sweet potato, tomato, yam, garlic,
Fruit Apple, Coconut, Cherry, Dates, Figs, Grape,
Bean Products Tofu
Nuts and seeds Almond, black sesame seeds, coconut (meat)
Fish Eel, herring, mackerel, mussel, octopus, oyster, sturgeon, tuna, trout
Meat Beef, chicken, chicken liver, duck, goose, ham, lamb, pheasant, quail, venison
Dairy Chicken egg, milk,
Herbs and spices Bay leaves, liquorices
Condiments Barley malt, honey, molasses, rice syrup
Supplements Algae, ginseng (American, Chinese, and Korean), pollen, royal jelly

Recipes:

What to Avoid

  • Avoid or at least moderate use of the microwave and processed foods.
  • Avoid all cold or raw foods (particularly citrus and sprouts)
  • Avoid fried greasy foods
  • Avoid processed sugars, large meals and rich foods.
  • Moderate your dairy intake

Other ways to Nourish Qi

  • Relaxation.
  • Mindfulness Meditation.
  • Moderate exercise.
  • Breathing (deep) fresh clean air.
  • Life-affirming activities.
  • Maintaining a positive attitude.
  • Spending time in nature or natural environment.
  • Tai chi / Qi gong.


James O’Sullivan from Galway is a credible and engaging speaker, a people friendly practitioner and lecturer of Integrated Medicine, serving his patients, his students and the public with the positive benefits of both Conventional Western Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine. He is a respected author and has appeared on many public media. #jamushur


Disclaimer

This article is not intended to diagnose or assess. The information provided is not to be considered a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care practitioner.


Please share! Help the word get out. Pin the graphic too.