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Sun Si Miao – famous physician


Chinese Medicine is a deep and intricate art that has been practiced for thousands of years. Throughout its history, there have been many famous physicians who have advanced and grown its capacity to help people. We are indebted to the man famous practitioners and teachers who devoted their lives to contribute to its long history. Without these contributions, we would never have the knowledge and skills, techniques and literature to practice and further develop this medicine today.

Sun Si-Miao, a Chinese Medicine physician, during the Tang dynasty (618-907 AD) wrote the following beautiful advice and it serves to emphasize the art, science, and honesty aspects of the medicine we practice here. It is a useful code for practitioners of any form of medicine…


A Guide to Medical Workers: “The Golden Principle”

When people come to you with a serious disease and ask for help, you cannot concern yourself with whether they are esteemed or dishonorable, wealthy or poor, elderly or young, beautiful or ugly. Your care must be safe, and not swayed by whether they are your dearest family member or your adversary, your good friend or a stranger, American or foreigner, foolish or wise. In your mind’s eye each patient is on the same level, degree and class, and is treated as close as family. Your care must never by self-serving or motivated by what brings good for bad fortune, or by that which is pleasing or upsetting. Your protection and care should be precisely what is necessary: no more, no less, without deference to your own safety and life. Know, in your heart, that your good deeds are sincere and not a game. Show courage but caution. Actively explore and broaden your knowledge but stand firmly on the principles of which you are certain.

Chinese Medicine is not a “cure-all”, but it is an effective, adaptable medicine that when used properly can treat any number of conditions. There is a responsibility on the practitioner’s part to listen closely to the patient and use all their skills to devise appropriate treatments.

There is also a responsibility on the patient’s part to involve themselves in their own health and wellbeing. By making dietary, lifestyle, and mental changes, patients can greatly improve their health and live a more full and vibrant life.


In the Smiling Body clinic, we hope all our patients that you will not just be free from illness, but that you will learn to lead vibrant lives that enable you to grow stronger mentally and physically throughout your years.
I have also included with this article some famous sayings by Sun Si-Miao. Like all famous sayings that survive time and scrutinization and critique over history, I would advise to read with an open mind and accepting heart.

Sun Si Miao Quotes:

Medicine is intention. Those who are proficient at using intention are good doctors.” ~ Sun Si Miao

First, modify the patient’s diet and lifestyle and only then, if these do not effect a cure, treat with medicinal herbs and acupuncture.” ~ Sun Si Miao

Whenever a great physician treats disease, he has to be mentally calm and his nature firm. He should not give way to wishes and desires but must develop first a marked attitude of compassion.He should commit himself firmly to the willingness to take the effort to save every living creature.” ~ Sun Si Miao

Doctors should first understand the cause of disease, then treat it with diet. Medicine should only be used if diet fails.” ~ Sun Si Miao

Above all, I will keep an open heart. As I move on the right path I will receive great happiness as a reward without asking for anything in return.” ~ Sun Si Miao

Food is Medicine too!



Disclaimer

This article is not intended to diagnose or assess. The information provided is not to be considered a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care practitioner.


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Practical Chinese Medicine

Shop for this Book

This book is an introduction to Traditional Chinese Medicine from the perspective of Tuina Chinese Medical Acupressure. It guides the student through the theories and cultural philosophies of this exceptional medical discipline. It is an excellent first year student textbook that is written in the same down to earth, easy to understand sentences that the ancient Chinese practitioners used to teach their students. It covers everything in the necessary foundation to begin your lifelong study of this outstanding medical discipline.

Buy this Book here.


James O’Sullivan from Galway is a credible and engaging speaker, a people friendly practitioner and lecturer of Integrated Medicine, serving his patients, his students and the public with the positive benefits of both Conventional Western Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine. He is a respected author and has appeared on many public media.


Disclaimer

This article is not intended to diagnose or assess. The information provided is not to be considered a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care practitioner.


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Traditional Chinese Medical Posters


These beautifully illustrated posters contain all the acupoints you need in order to complete your training in acupuncture, Tuina or Shiatsu. It is also an excellent focus point for your clinic to show your clients and patients the acupoints used in treatment.

Convenient and stylish 12″ x 18″ or 30cm x 45cm size poster can be purchased with link on each image.


Click to Shop for this Poster

Click to Shop for this Poster

Click to Shop for this Poster


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The twelve Heavenly Star qi-points of Ma Dan Yang, who was a famous Daoist practitioner of traditional Chinese medicine, around 1140 A.D. These are his famous chosen Qi-points as recorded in his ode to 11 miraculous acupuncture points, which was published in the Jade Dragon Manual in 1329. the twelfth Qi-point LR-03 was added by Xu Feng who introduced the Eight Extraordinary Vessels.

These excellent, important and powerful points should always be considered when diagnosing and choosing your point prescription.


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The Eight Extraordinary Vessels are considered to be more ancient than the conventional meridian system and yet so simple and powerful when energised, stimulated or balanced for their related conditions. A must for every practitioner of traditional Chinese medicine.

Convenient and stylish 12″ x 18″ size poster can be purchased by clicking the image below.



The Five Elements/Phases, translated from Wu Xing, is an exceptional ancient form of traditional medicine. This poster stays true to the original texts of the Wu Xing masters who used this method to treat a wide variety of conditions. It contains the Wu Xing acupoints of the 12 Zang Fu Organs and the Mother and Child acupoints (Tonification and Sedation points). Also included is the Horary Clock which is used to diagnose and treat the Patterns of Disharmony.

Convenient and stylish 12″ x 18″ or 30cm x 45cm size poster can be purchased, by clicking on the images below


Click to Shop for this Poster

Click to Shop for this Poster

The Horary point is the local acupoint to a particular meridian (i.e. wood point on a wood pathway). This local meridian acupoint becomes a horary point during the two-hour period of maximum energy for that particular meridian. Outside of that time slot, it returns to a normal acupoint. The horary acupoint become a very powerful point for body/mind/ spirit during the horary time slot. Activating the horary acupoint, we can reach the official and boost and revitalize the Qi of that element. It works similar to when a poker is used to stoke the ashes of a fire, and allow the fire to blaze.

This class of acupoint plays a major role in some techniques involving the Stems, where some points are considered closed or open depending on specific time, month or year.

Convenient and stylish 12″ x 18″ size poster can be purchased with link below.


Chick to Shop for this Poster

The Five Elements or Phases of Chinese Medicine have brought a rich understanding of health and especially so with Chinese Nutritional Healing. This poster helps with identifying the foods associated with each Element. It makes an ideal study aid or educational poster for the clinic reception.


Hope you like these posters and they are very helpful in your training into the most gratifying career there can be, that is helping others with Traditional Chinese Medicine.

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Chen Pi Chicken


Chen Pi Ji (Chicken)

This popular dish can be found all over China. Ji translates to Chicken while Chen Pi translates to strips of dried orange or tangerine peel. Chen Pi is classified a herb in the same way as garlic is a herb. It has wonderful benefits for health. You can find more about Chen Pi here. Orange peel or sauce is used to flavour chicken. This recipe can be grilled, roasted or barbeque.

A lazy way of kinda enjoying Chen Pi Ji, is to order it from your local Chinese restaurant. The ‘orange chicken’ dish is commonly offered in many Chinese restaurants in the West, which is cooked in orange sauce. The sauce is often made from orange peel too. Its not as healthy as this home cooked recipe.

Ingredients:

  • 4 chicken pieces (thighs, drumsticks or breasts)
  • 1 tablespoon shaoxing rice wine (or dry sherry)
  • 2 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon soya sauce
  • 1 tablespoon chen pi, chopped finely
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • clump of root ginger, very finely grated

Directions:

  • Mix everything together n a large dish. Make sure that the chicken pieces are covered evenly. Leave this to marinate overnight, no hurry.
  • When you are ready to eat or cook for later. Grill, roast or barbecue, until the chicken is cooked with the juices running clear.
  • Eat with some rice another great energy booster.
  • You can also eat this delicious dish cold.

Chinese Medical Benefits:

Chicken is considered a great Qi tonic and nourishing food. The chen pi, ginger and garlic are warming and promote smooth flow inside to help to clear Phlegm. This dish is a great general tonic dish with warming and strengthening nature. It is recommended for conditions like Qi stagnation and Phlegm.



James O’Sullivan from Galway is a credible and engaging speaker, a people friendly practitioner and lecturer of Integrated Medicine, serving his patients, his students and the public with the positive benefits of both Conventional Western Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine. He is a respected author and has appeared on many public media.


Disclaimer

This article is not intended to diagnose or assess. The information provided is not to be considered a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care practitioner.


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Treating Yang Deficiency

You may suffer one of more of the above. If in doubt see a practitioner.


Ancient Chinese people were greatly interested in the relationships and patterns that occurred in nature. Instead of studying situations and things in isolation, they viewed the world as a harmonious and holistic entity. In their eyes, no single being or form could exist unless it was seen in relation to its surrounding environment. By simplifying these relationships, they tried to explain complicated phenomena in the universe.

Yang is the energy that is responsible for warming and activating bodily functions. When Yang is in decline or deficient you feel cold and your body begins to slow down, displaying signs of under activity. There are a number of simple methods to tonify Yang.

Clinical pIcture: Deficient Yang syndrome is manifested as aversion to cold, cold extremities, soreness and weakness or cold pain in the lower back and knees, impotence, spermatorrhea, sterility, watery leukorrhea, enuresis, pale, wet and swollen tongue coating, deep slow, weak, pulse, wheezing and diarrhea (without odour).

Foods that benefit Yang, with the greatest tonics in bold:

Animal protein: Lamb, Venison, Kidneys (both beef and lamb), Chicken,
Lobster, Mussel, Prawn, Shrimp, Trout, Anchovy,
Grains: Quinoa, sweet (glutinous) rice, wheat germ
Vegetables: Leek, mustard greens, onion, radish, scallion, squash, sweet potato, turnip, watercress
Fruits: Raspberry, Cherry, Lychee, Logan berry, Peach, Strawberry
Nuts and seeds: ChestnutsPistachio nuts, Walnuts, Pine Nuts,
Herbs/other: Basil, Clove, Black pepper, Chive seed, Rosemary, Fennel seed, Fenugreek seed, Horseradish, Caper, Cayenne, Cinnamon bark, Dill seed, Garlic, Ginger, Nutmeg, Peppermint, Sage, Savory, Spearmint, Star anise, Turmeric, Thyme, White Pepper
Beverages: Jasmine tea, Chai tea,

Every day western foods examples that can be used to Tonify Yang

  • Mussels cooked with a little garlic
  • Roast chicken with sage and thyme
  • Roasted vegetables with and rosemary
  • Rice porridge with cinnamon, nutmeg and a little brown sugar
  • Leek and potato soup with black pepper
  • Or by adding any of the many spices as listed above to dishes when cooking.

Foods to avoid. If you are experiencing Yang deficiency then it is important to avoid foods that will further deplete your body’s Yang energy. Cold food and liquids fall into this category. Here ‘cold foods’ refers not only to those directly taken from the fridge but also to raw foods, as these require extra energy for digestion compared to pre-cooked foods. This may mean choosing a pasta salad over a green salad or switching from muesli to oat porridge for breakfast.

It is important to remember that we can change the “nature” of food to warming foods by cooking or warming them. This will preserve their energetic and nutrient value, while increasing their Yang nature, therefore soups, porridge and slow roasted foods show become the dishes of choice for those with a Yang deficiency. The herbs and spices mentioned above are warming and as such in small amounts encourage digestion and circulation throughout the body. While it may seem reasonable to achieve an improved warming effect by using the stronger spices such as black pepper liberally, care needs to be taken as these can be used to excess, inducing sweating which in fact actually has a cooling drying effect on the body.

Herbs That Tonify Yang

In general, herbs that tonify Yang are warm and dry in nature.  They can injure Yin and give rise to fire, so they are contraindicated for a person with deficient Yin and excessive fire syndrome.

Incomplete – Come back for more later………..



James O’Sullivan from Galway is a credible and engaging speaker, a people friendly practitioner and lecturer of Integrated Medicine, serving his patients, his students and the public with the positive benefits of both Conventional Western Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine. He is a respected author and has appeared on many public media.


Disclaimer

This article is not intended to diagnose or assess. The information provided is not to be considered a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care practitioner.


Please share! Help the word get out. Pin the graphic too.