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Headache and Migraine due to HBP, Stress and PMS


Try these for headaches due to high blood pressure, menstrual cycles, emotional stress or tension, or migraines.

  • Take lemon juice and 4g baking soda mixed in a glass of water and drink.
  • Make tea of Chinese prunes, mint, and green tea.
  • Make tea of oyster shells and chrysanthemum flowers, slowly boiling the shells for 90 minutes, then adding the flowers for the last 30 minutes.
  • Mash peach kernels and walnuts. Mix with rice wine and lightly roast; take 2 teaspoons three times daily.
  • Rinse head with warm water, gradually increasing the temperature to hot.
  • Make carrot juice. If headache is on the left side, squirt carrot juice into left nostril; if on the right side, squirt into right nostril; if both sides are painful, squirt into both nostrils.

Food is Medicine Too!



Disclaimer

This article is not intended to diagnose or assess. The information provided is not to be considered a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care practitioner.


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Jobs Tears Whitefish Stew


Job’s tears (also called coix seed) is a popular allergy remedy in Asia that tastes like barley but does not contain gluten (a protein that may cause inflammation). Job’s tears have also been shown to suppress allergic reactions and balance the immune system. Adlay or Job’s tears -It’s sweet and cold, rich in protein, vitamins B2. It can make the skin smooth, reduce wrinkles.

Spinach and mushrooms are amazing sources of folate (vitamin B9). A folate deficiency can contribute to atherosclerosis and dementia. Medications used for rheumatoid arthritis can deplete vitamin B9 in the body, so stock up on folate-rich veggies to replenish this vital nutrient!

Garlic and onions contain powerful antioxidants that reduce free-radical damage and scar tissue on the arteries. It has also been shown to reduce homocysteine levels in the blood, a marker that indicates inflammation.

  • 2 cups (500 mL) chopped onion
  • 2 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 8 cups (2 L) vegetable stock
  • 1 cup (250 mL) Job’s tears (yi yi ren), soaked in water overnight and drained
  • 2 Tbsp (30 mL) finely chopped fresh ginger root
  • 14 oz (400 g) white fish (halibut, black cod, pollock)
  • 1 cup (250 mL) fresh sliced shiitake mushrooms
  • 6 cups (1.5 L) baby spinach or bok choy
  • 1/4 cup (60 mL) lime juice
  • 1 cup (250 mL) chopped basil or cilantro
  • 1/2 tsp (2 mL) grey or pink sea salt (or to taste)
  • 3 spring onions, finely chopped

Place onion, garlic, stock, Job’s tears, and ginger in stockpot and bring to a rolling boil. Reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer for 45 minutes to an hour.

Place fish and shiitake mushrooms on top of ingredients and simmer for an additional 15 minutes.

Add all remaining ingredients. Simmer for 5 minutes and then remove from heat.

Ladle into individual serving bowls and garnish with spring onion. Serve hot.

Serves 12.

Each serving contains: 151 calories; 13 g protein; 3 g total fat (1 g sat. fat, 0 g trans fat); 19 g total carbohydrates (4 g sugars, 2 g fibre); 359 mg sodium

Option:

Add a dash of fish oil to each bowl before serving. Make sure the soup has cooled enough to prevent damaging the omega-3 fatty acids in the fish oil.

Note: Job’s tears are found in many health food stores and Asian supermarkets.

Job’s tears are often mistakenly labelled as Chinese pearled barley in Asian markets. If you are a celiac, it is important to avoid buying in bulk due to potential contamination with gluten. Slow cooker convenience

This recipe can also be made in a slow cooker. Throw all the ingredients—except the green vegetables, herbs, and lime juice—into the slow cooker and cook for a minimum of two hours on high. Add the greens and lime juice at the end and enjoy!

My thanks to Julie Daniluk, RHN  juliedaniluk.com for this excellent recipe.



Disclaimer

This article is not intended to diagnose or assess. The information provided is not to be considered a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care practitioner.


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Chen Pi Chicken


Chen Pi Ji (Chicken)

This popular dish can be found all over China. Ji translates to Chicken while Chen Pi translates to strips of dried orange or tangerine peel. Chen Pi is classified a herb in the same way as garlic is a herb. It has wonderful benefits for health. You can find more about Chen Pi here. Orange peel or sauce is used to flavour chicken. This recipe can be grilled, roasted or barbeque.

A lazy way of kinda enjoying Chen Pi Ji, is to order it from your local Chinese restaurant. The ‘orange chicken’ dish is commonly offered in many Chinese restaurants in the West, which is cooked in orange sauce. The sauce is often made from orange peel too. Its not as healthy as this home cooked recipe.

Ingredients:

  • 4 chicken pieces (thighs, drumsticks or breasts)
  • 1 tablespoon shaoxing rice wine (or dry sherry)
  • 2 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon soya sauce
  • 1 tablespoon chen pi, chopped finely
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • clump of root ginger, very finely grated

Directions:

  • Mix everything together n a large dish. Make sure that the chicken pieces are covered evenly. Leave this to marinate overnight, no hurry.
  • When you are ready to eat or cook for later. Grill, roast or barbecue, until the chicken is cooked with the juices running clear.
  • Eat with some rice another great energy booster.
  • You can also eat this delicious dish cold.

Chinese Medical Benefits:

Chicken is considered a great Qi tonic and nourishing food. The chen pi, ginger and garlic are warming and promote smooth flow inside to help to clear Phlegm. This dish is a great general tonic dish with warming and strengthening nature. It is recommended for conditions like Qi stagnation and Phlegm.



James O’Sullivan from Galway is a credible and engaging speaker, a people friendly practitioner and lecturer of Integrated Medicine, serving his patients, his students and the public with the positive benefits of both Conventional Western Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine. He is a respected author and has appeared on many public media.


Disclaimer

This article is not intended to diagnose or assess. The information provided is not to be considered a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care practitioner.


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Orange Lemon Detox


Thirst Quencher

When your looking for that anytime refreshing drink either during a detox or just as a thirst quencher. This recipe is one of the simplest I have ever made and is particularly effective after overindulging in a hectic social activities. This drink will flood your body with phytonutrients that help to restore, rejuvenate and recharge the body with all of its beneficial properties. And while our bodies do an excellent job of detoxifying on their own, certain nutrients help it in its detox process!

So with this simple beverage you’ll flood your body with anti-aging and disease-fighting phytonutrients and bloat-fighting potassium and water and those phytonutrients will help to mop up damage caused by free radicals and toxins from processed foods, pollution and stress!

Enjoy!

Makes: 8 servings

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Ingredients

  • 2 liters still water (or sparkling water)
  • 2 oranges, sliced
  • 2-3 mint leaves (optional)
  • 1 lime, sliced
  • 1 tablespoon apple-cider vinegar

Instructions

In a large pitcher combine all ingredients. Refrigerate for 1-2 hours before serving. Serve at room temperature in cold weather. Drink throughout the day



Disclaimer

This article is not intended to diagnose or assess. The information provided is not to be considered a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care practitioner.


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Beating Influenza with Soup

Here’s a really great soup to treat the colds and flues that seem to be so prevalent this year.

Boil 10g yellow soybeans in water for 15 minutes; add 30g parsley and boil again for 15 minutes. Drink the soup and stay in bed to perspire.



James O’Sullivan from Galway is a credible and engaging speaker, a people friendly practitioner and lecturer of Integrated Medicine, serving his patients, his students and the public with the positive benefits of both Conventional Western Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine. He is a respected author and has appeared on many public media.


Disclaimer

This article is not intended to diagnose or assess. The information provided is not to be considered a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care practitioner.


 

Please share! Help the word get out. Pin the graphic too.